It’s AriAna, not ArianA

dumblesaur

I would like to start with something a little controversial. I didn’t exactly find Dumbledore as endearing as others do. Sorry. I know some people are very protective over him! The constant ‘this is something I should have told you a while ago’ point that kept coming up started to wear a bit thin, and his motivations behind “helping” Harry got me a bit suspicious. I couldn’t quite work out whether it was because he was a means to an end for the war and violence, and he wasn’t so bothered about the quality of Harry’s life due to the fact he was a ticking time bomb. He asked too much of two largely innocent people, and Harry was left with all the tasks without knowing the truth about his own life. Did he keep it a secret because he was a child and thought it would be too much, or did he keep it a secret because he might not want to be involved anymore? He clearly knew pretty much everything right from the start and so went to any lengths necessary to make sure the plan worked out. This hurt A LOT of people in the process. I understand that technically a lot more people would have been hurt if Voldemort (sorry) wasn’t stopped, so I don’t envy him his moral dilemma. I just obviously didn’t know about this at the time. There was a huge roller-coaster of feelings of towards him that I still haven’t levelled out.

When Dumbledore was being killed I was touched that he used Petrificus Totalus on Harry but went through a varied range of emotions and thoughts on this when more was revealed. At first, Dumbledore was protecting Harry knowing he would try and valiantly stop Snape and he didn’t want harm coming to him. Then I thought ‘well, is it selfishly motivated?’ He obviously didn’t want Harry to hurt Snape knowing what he was doing for him, and all the double-crossing mess that was happening, but then he didn’t want Harry to be hurt either as he is the only one who could have stopped Voldemort. Maybe it was a mixture of everything. The whole plan would have been usurped by just one flick of Harry’s wand and then all that work was for nothing.

I did get more interested in him when his family history started coming in to it, but it took a long time to get there so I wasn’t initially that taken by it all. I also got a bit distracted when I found out his Sister was called Ariana and his Mum was called Kendra and zoned out imagining ‘Keeping Up with The Dumbledores’. I had to snap back in after my brain thought up an episode involving Ariana breaking her curfew to “just go and get a frothy no fat Butterbeer it’s so totally not a big deal” and told Kendra she was fired. This was clearly in a time when ‘literally’ literally meant ‘in a literal sense’ and most of the world, for good reason, had never even heard of the phrase ‘Momager’. J.K. Rowling probably thought that these were mystical, pretty names. And they are! They just conjure The Valley, Ugg’s and Pumpkin Spice instead of locked up and Hollow. Actually, never mind. Let’s continue. The parallels between Harry and Ariana – his time in the cupboard under the stairs, being set upon by Dudley for being different when they found out about his magical powers, and spending his whole life being hidden away due because he was a ‘freak’, was possibly why Dumbledore was in his own way so keen to help him. He felt that he owed something to the Sister he badly mistreated, and this went some way to alleviating his guilt. It also explains his dislike of the Dudley’s and why he always seemed so disdainful of the family whenever he showed up. I can’t deny I was annoyed for a while about him sending Harry back to the Dursleys. He quite clearly knew how he was being treated there. When the reason for that did become apparent though, you’ll be relieved to know I was fine about it. His stoic and calm influence in the face of aggression was something I did always find refreshing. Making enemies seem like fools by refusing to stoop to their level was something I immediately liked about him. It’s a great thing to teach children. All these lessons we’re learning…

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